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    Verdi: La Traviata

    Conductor: Ivan Repusic; Stage Director: Götz Friedrich; With Marina Rebeka, Dmytro Popov, Markus Brück et al.

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    Sat 19. April 2014 / 19:30h / read more

    C-Prices: € 90,– / 72,– / 50,– / 29,– / buy ticket

    tickethotline: 030.343 84 343

  • next highlights

    Rigoletto

    Conductor: Roberto Rizzi Brignoli; Stage Director: Jan Bosse; With Piero Pretti, Markus Brück, Elena Tsallagova, Bastiaan Everink, Tobias Kehrer, Dana Beth Miller et al.

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    Sun 20. April 2014 / 18:00h / read more

    C-Prices: € 90,– / 72,– / 50,– / 29,– / buy ticket

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    Richard Wagner: Parsifal

    Conductor: Axel Kober; Stage-Director: Philipp Stölzl; With Bo Skovhus, Tobias Kehrer, Hans-Peter König, Stefan Vinke, Bastiaan Everink, Evelyn Herlitzius et al.

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    Mon 21. April 2014 / 16:00h / read more

    D-Prices: € 122,–- / 89,– / 64,– / 38,– / buy ticket

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    Premiere: Der Liebestrank

    Conductor: Roberto Rizzi Brignoli; Stage-Director: Irina Brook; With Nicola Alaimo, Simon Pauly, Dimitri Pittas, Heidi Stober, Alexandra Hutton et al.

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    Fri 25. April 2014 / 19:30h / read more

    D-Prices: € 122,–- / 89,– / 64,– / 38,– / buy ticket

    tickethotline: 030.343 84 343

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    Open Air in der Waldbühne: Die Zauberflöte

    Conductor: Donald Runnicles; Stage Director: Gerlinde Pelkowski; With Ante Jerkunica, Yosep Kang, Hulkar Sabirova, Elena Tsallagova, Simon Pauly et al. / Buy now!

    next performance

    Sat 23. August 2014 / 19:30h / read more

    22,60 - 73,60 € / buy ticket

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    Verdi: La Traviata

    Conductor: Ivan Repusic; Stage Director: Götz Friedrich; With Marina Rebeka, Dmytro Popov, Markus Brück et al.

    next performance

    Sat 19. April 2014 / 19:30h / read more

    C-Prices: € 90,– / 72,– / 50,– / 29,– / buy ticket

    tickethotline: 030.343 84 343

  • next highlights

    Rigoletto

    Conductor: Roberto Rizzi Brignoli; Stage Director: Jan Bosse; With Piero Pretti, Markus Brück, Elena Tsallagova, Bastiaan Everink, Tobias Kehrer, Dana Beth Miller et al.

    next performance

    Sun 20. April 2014 / 18:00h / read more

    C-Prices: € 90,– / 72,– / 50,– / 29,– / buy ticket

    tickethotline: 030.343 84 343

  • next highlights

    Richard Wagner: Parsifal

    Conductor: Axel Kober; Stage-Director: Philipp Stölzl; With Bo Skovhus, Tobias Kehrer, Hans-Peter König, Stefan Vinke, Bastiaan Everink, Evelyn Herlitzius et al.

    next performance

    Mon 21. April 2014 / 16:00h / read more

    D-Prices: € 122,–- / 89,– / 64,– / 38,– / buy ticket

    tickethotline: 030.343 84 343




News

Wed, 9. Apr.
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Premiere: “Elixir of Love” / 25th Ap...

A sad comment on love, if love depends on a magic potion and tears Anglo-French director Irina Brook makes her Berlin...

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Premiere: “Elixir of Love” / 25th April 2014

Stan Hema; Fotografie © 2013, Heji Shin

Stan Hema; Fotografie © 2013, Heji Shin

A sad comment on love,
if love depends on a magic potion and tears

Anglo-French director Irina Brook makes her Berlin debut with “Elixir of Love”


Opera doesn’t come more cost-effective than this: a single teardrop in Donizetti’s ELIXIR OF LOVE is sufficient to cut through all the complications and clear the way for a happy end to this otherwise decidedly unfunny comic opera. This single “furtive lagrima” trickles from the eye of the young Adina as she witnesses her suitor Nemorino becoming the object of the village girls’ wily attentions when news gets out that he has inherited a fortune. And it is this tear that tells Nemorino that Adina loves him and gives him the courage to discuss the situation with her.

In his 1832 work Donizetti recounts the tale of a shy boy and a pretty yet coquettish girl, the sort of story that in real life, far from delivering the lieto fine, is likely to stir up sentimental memories of one’s first unrequited crush. This is because, unlike many comic operas where the fun is based on a hectic chain of ridiculous events, in ELIXIR OF LOVE a tragic end to the story is always hovering over proceedings, right up until the happy dénouement. In this as in other respects, however, Donizetti’s acknowledged ability to suffuse the jollity of comic opera with a romantic melancholy found a perfect outlet in ELIXIR OF LOVE. Nemorino’s music in particular ennobles him; his enthusiastic “Quanto è bella, quanto è cara” early on and above all the great aria “Una furtiva lagrima” transform this peasant, who would appear gauche without the music, into an endearing boy with a golden heart. Small wonder that this opera is so beloved of tenors and was one of Luciano Pavarotti’s pieces de resistance.

Even though Donizetti holds his characters in affection, ELIXIR OF LOVE is nonetheless a comic opera in which he pokes gentle fun at them – at naïve Nemorino and self-confident Adina and in particular at Nemorino’s rival, the brash Sergeant Belcore, and the persuasive quack Dulcamara, seller of the supposed love potion that Nemorino hopes will make Adina love him.

It is a blend of gaiety, whackiness and melancholy that recalls the films of Federico Fellini, which is why, in preparing for her new production at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, director Irina Brook drew on some of the images encountered in early Fellini works such as “La Strada” and “I notti di Cabiria” and has set the love story in the milieu of a travelling Italian theatre troupe of the early 1950s.

ELIXIR OF LOVE has always been considered a singer’s opera par excellence, although in traditional productions this has often been at the expense of the acting. For this production the Deutsche Oper Berlin has resisted the allure of established stars and thrown in its lot with a group of young singers, all of who are on the cusp of their individual careers. Nemorino is played by one of the great new hopes in the tenor category. Dimitri Pittas has already sung the part, to great acclaim, at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, his hometown, and debuted at the Deutsche Oper Berlin as Alfredo, singing alongside Anja Harteros in LA TRAVIATA. Adina is delivered by US soprano Heidi Stober, a singer whose turns at the Deutsche Oper Berlin have been the springboard to an international career. She has sung a number of the great Mozart roles, such as Susanna and Pamina, and could also be seen as Princess Ninetta in Robert Carsen’s celebrated production of Prokofiev’s THE LOVE FOR THREE ORANGES. Sergeant Belcore will be played by Simon Pauly, another singer from the house ensemble, while the part of the dubious Doctor Dulcamara goes to Nicola Alaimo, a young Sicilian singer showing considerable promise as a specialist in traditional Italian basso buffo. The stand will be occupied by one of the leading Italian opera conductors of the younger generation: Roberto Rizzi Brignoli debuted in 1998 at La Scala with Donizetti’s LUCREZIA BORGIA and has already conducted works such as LA TRAVIATA and RIGOLETTO at the Deutsche Oper Berlin.

Gaetano Donizetti
ELIXIR OF LOVE

Musical direction Roberto Rizzi Brignoli Production Irina Brook Set design Noëlle Ginefri Costumes Sylvie Martin-Hyszka Featuring Nicola Alaimo, Simon Pauly, Dimitri Pittas, Heidi Stober and Alexandra Hutton Chorus and Orchestra of the Deutsche Oper Berlin
Premiere on 25. April 2014
Further performances on 30th April and 3rd, 8th and 10th May 2014

Fri, 7. Mar
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Season Preview 2014/2015

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Season Preview 2014/2015

Expand our Season Book 2014/2015
All about our opera premieres, the opera and ballet repertoire, the concerts and chamber music et al.

or available for download as [pdf-document]

or as a hard copy from the opera house
Please be as kind as to send an E-mail to info@deutscheoperberlin.de

Tue, 1. Apr.
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Cast Change: Clémentine Margaine wil...

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Cast Change: Clémentine Margaine will be singing Marguerite

Clémentine Margaine © Bettina Stöß

Clémentine Margaine © Bettina Stöß

Elina Garanca would like to delay her return to the stage after her maternity leave is over. For this reason Elina Garanca will be replaced by Clémentine Margaine in the role of Marguerite on 23rd, 26th and 29th May and 1st June.

Clémentine Margaine has already received rave reviews for her Marguerite in the premiere of DAMNATION OF FAUST. Following her debut “Die Welt” wrote: “Her two songs, the King of Thule with solo viola and Gretchen at the spinning wheel with cor anglais, are poignantly beautiful. We would never have tired of listening to Clémentine Margaine’s shimmering mezzo-soprano and the two soloists.” “Opernglas” magazine was equally enthusiastic, writing of the first night: “Marguerite’s delightful D’amour l’ardente flamme was exquisitely rendered by Clémentine Margaine in a rich mezzo-soprano voice that was at home in the deeper reaches of the scale.” She will be accompanied on stage by Ildebrando d’Arcangelo as Méphistophélès and Matthew Polenzani as Faust.

On 14th, 17th and 20th December Elina Garanca will be appearing again at the Deutsche Oper Berlin as Octavian in Richard Strauss’ DER ROSENKAVALIER.

For all queries and enquiries please call 030-343 84 343.

Wed, 19. Mar.
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“This man never reveals his secret”

Roland Schwab directs and interprets Mozart’s unfathomable DON GIOVANNI In Mozart’s DON GIOVANNI, staged by Roland Sc...

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“This man never reveals his secret”

Roland Schwab directs and interprets Mozart’s unfathomable DON GIOVANNI

In Mozart’s DON GIOVANNI, staged by Roland Schwab in 2010 at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, a character is at large whom we are inclined to think we know but who says of himself: “You will never find out who I am”. Groping for his own personal slant, the director grapples purposefully with a material pregnant with meaning and comes up with a demonic Don Giovanni whose eyes drag people down into the depths one moment and twinkle with wit the next. This leads to some schizophrenic situations and wicked game-playing, and yet something became clear in rehearsals that pleased Schwab no end - that the leaden message, the gloom and murkiness, is anything but heavy in the way that it is conveyed on stage; it floats, not least thanks to the energy of the players. “In my mind there’s nothing worse than presenting leaden themes in a leaden way,” says Schwab, and the composer could hardly have said it better himself.

As far back as 2006 Schwab was to be found at the Deutsche Oper Berlin demonstrating a deftness of touch in the way he handled Mozart. In FRAGMENTS he triumphed unexpectedly by breathing life into some of the composer’s isolated pieces and rejected sketches. With DON GIOVANNI Roland Schwab was dealing with a work “that is unquestionably sublime, a piece which lends itself to fresh interpretations.” And Schwab certainly interpreted it! 40 years old at the time, he took a veritable plunge into the psyche of Don Giovanni, erecting a mysterious cosmos to the title character, one that has informed not a few productions of DON GIOVANNI since. In many versions of the opera the main protagonist remains two-dimensional, as if there were only two paths that the character can take – seduction or plain sexual deviancy.

Schwab avowedly rejects these oft-cited clichés. The collected expectations and interpretations of centuries of productions have created a myth that envelops the character like a straitjacket, and when Schwab toys with hackneyed ideas and with quotes from the annals of criticism, he is referring to a panoply of thoughts that amount to a riddle, an enigma. Schwab’s production can be seen as an appeal for male sexuality, lean and streamlined: “Being erotic is about not revealing a secret, and people can’t keep secrets. Why are we continually presented with eroticism as if it were a blunt instrument? Why are the male protagonists always reduced to that denominator? It robs them of any aura. Plus: it’s not attractive figures and good bone structure that make characters fascinating. Why do some actors who are far from the Hollywood ideal of beauty exert the pull that they do? Because they’re in possession of a certain secret and they keep it to themselves. The erotic is a delicate subject on stage; it’s so often handled badly. There are other sides of male erotica to explore, and the audience can read other things into it, other depths, other abysses.”

For some time now Roland Schwab has been exploring Scriabin, ecstasy and oblique ways of presenting the erotic. He has written two scripts, both dealing with the veiled possibilities of intellectual sexuality. This interest in the subject has found expression in his Don Giovanni. We are presented with a man whose erotic forays are largely in his head, a man who is much more interested in jousting erotically with women in his mind than he is in physical erotic play. Not only is it more interesting; it is also much more dangerous, and Don Giovanni has perfected the art. He moves his mental chess pieces about the boards, indulging himself in his sadistic game and playing a number of opponents simultaneously. His does not aim to seduce – he has seduced thousands of times before – but rather to cause pain. He plays with the hurt feelings of women as a way of discovering something about himself. He feeds on their emotional excesses in order to fill his “horror vacui”, to inject life into himself. The women are never ends in themselves. They are just a means to fulfilling his wish to go beyond the final frontier. His actual goal is transcendence.

If someone could check him and break the syndrome, he would be saved. But the characters around him do not provide the disturbance or obstacle that he needs at an elemental level. This is a central aspect in Schwab’s production. “Regardless of whether he’s a monster, in his inverted form he is also, to a certain extent, a seeker after God. At this point it is worth taking the opera’s subtitle seriously: Don Giovanni or the Rake Punished. His secret, unadmitted yearning is for punishment, yet he is not granted his Judgement Day. Don Giovanni, a Tartarus figure on an endless loop… indeed the least redeemed character in the history of opera, arguably even less redeemed than the Flying Dutchman.”

Don Giovanni
Musikalische Leitung: Friedemann Layer
Inszenierung: Roland Schwab
20., 29. März.; 4. April; 27., 30. Mai; 8. Juni 2014

Tue, 18. Feb.
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Interview with Christian Spuck about...

Christian Spuck is one of the big names among choreographers of the younger generation. In recent years he has been maki...

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Interview with Christian Spuck about “La damnation de Faust” / 23. February 2014

Motiv Stan Hema © 2013, Heji Shin

Motiv Stan Hema © 2013, Heji Shin

Christian Spuck is one of the big names among choreographers of the younger generation. In recent years he has been making his mark as resident choreographer at the Stuttgart Ballet and has been Ballet Director at the Zurich Opera since 2012. Christian Spuck is also increasingly involved in the overlap between opera and dance. For the first time in Berlin he has donned the mantle of director and choreographer to produce Berlioz’ DAMNATION OF FAUST.
The interview was conducted by Uwe Friedrich.

“La damnation de Faust” by Hector Berlioz is neither opera nor oratorio, neither symphony nor ballet. How are you tackling this hybrid form as director?
In many ways it’s a unique and quirky piece and that’s exactly what makes “La Damnation de Faust” such a nice challenge. It’s quite a far cry from Goethe’s “Faust”, even if Berlioz took his inspiration from Goethe’s work. Berlioz doesn’t present us with a scientist in the final stage of his life and at his wit’s end, listening as Mephisto explains the facts of life. Berlioz gives us a lachrymose artist whose existence holds no comforts or pleasures, and logically the pact is not entered into until the final moments of the piece. But the key thing about Berlioz’ version is that he placed no great value on circumscribing time and space. We chop and change from Hungary to Leipzig to the banks of the Elbe. Some of these location changes occur within the space of a few seconds, which can pose serious problems for the staging. And we don’t know if Hector Berlioz even had a theatre performance in mind when he wrote the thing. I see it more as a kind of revue; it demands rapid-fire scene changes that are sometimes only tenuously linked. We’ve tried to bind these problems into the actual staging and decided to stress the revue side of the work with its loosely tacked-together scenes. We’ve arranged the orchestra in a ‘U’ shape and brought it out of the pit slightly so as to break the illusion from the outset that we’re doing an opera as it would have been done in the 19th century. In this version a lot is conveyed through the medium of music and ballet. We’ve got 10 dancers playing a major role throughout the entire production. Singing is just one artistic form of expression among many.

Hector Berlioz’ whole body of work is always being praised by the experts, yet despite the best efforts of countless artists it never seems to catch on properly with audiences.
I can’t say I’ve given that much thought, to be honest. I was grabbed by the music the first time I heard it. Berlioz wants to make music for the theatre. He tries to achieve sounds that were definitely ahead of their time. I’m quite sure Donald Runnicles will do a brilliant job bringing out this side of the music. The composition bolsters emotions and infuses the fantastical creatures with enthralling life. The piece straddles a musical spectrum ranging from the familiar Rakoczy March to the Sylphide Ballet and on to lesser-known albeit no-less-powerful musical numbers. I for one would love it if the music caught the affection of audiences.

As a dancer and choreographer you are used to stories being told via music and movement rather than by song. Do you apprehend opera differently to the way it is received by opera audiences, which are focused on the singing?
Singing is music. There’s no type of music I don’t like listening to and I really try to think about it and fathom it out, especially when I’m choreographing it. The first time I hear a piece of music, it’s all about feeling: Am I touched by it? Do I like it? Is the instrumentation good? After that comes the analytical process. What’s happening musically and why? But I start off listening like any other person. Opera is different from ballet in that it’s already there in front of you, as a complete work, and you just have to size it up and address it, whereas with a new choreography I have to create everything from scratch – the story, the choice of music, the spatial and temporal structure. Likewise the rehearsing: in opera the question hovering in the air is ‘why are people singing?’; in ballet the question is ‘why are people dancing?’ Both forms of artistic expression are decidedly abstract and artificial and have to persuade the audience. At this level of art we can narrate human stories, conjure up images, create sound environments, things that mere texts cannot do. I always love it when people who were in the audience come up to me after a ballet performance and say they were really affected and impressed and would definitely be coming back. It’s always just about telling a story, touching your audience and raising questions.

Opera singers are always saying how surprised and taken they are by what dancers can physically achieve with their bodies and what intensity of expression they are thus capable of. As a dancer and choreographer, are you also surprised and impressed by the vocal opportunities available to opera singers?
Right now, at the rehearsing stage, I have to say I’m pretty blown away. I’m working with amazing singers and yes, when they let rip during a rehearsal I sometimes get a bit choked up all of a sudden, because their voices can convey emotion in a resounding, very authentic way. We choreographers have learnt to tell stories by means of images and movements. We ponder on how and where we might locate a scene on stage, or how we might position the protagonists so as to heighten the drama. That can be a new experience for an opera singer working with a choreographer for the first time, since the spatial parameters dictate a certain set-up. At rehearsals this has to then be filled out with meaningful acting. It’s down to me to explain what’s motivating a particular character and why he or she is standing in that place on the stage. I notice that I am giving more thought to the spatial relation between soloists, chorus singers and dancers, as a way of creating a measure of tension. Other directors may start off by considering the psychological make-up of the protagonists and the spatial details come afterwards. I try to block the scene at an early stage. The chorus and all the singers figured that out pretty fast and are very supportive. No one has expressed any special wish to the effect that “I’d really like to be standing close to the prompter’s box and have the lights on me”, as the clichés about singers would have you believe.

23. Februar 2014
Hector Berlioz: „Fausts Verdammnis“
Conductor: Donald Runnicles
Stage Director and Choreography: Christian Spuck
With Klaus Florian Vogt, Clémentine Margaine, Samuel Youn et al.
Chorus, Opera ballet and Orchestra of the Deutsche Oper Berlin

Wed, 28. Aug.
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Foyer-Gallery: Photography © Heji Sh...

For the 2013/14 season at the Deutsche Oper Berlin the photographer Heji Shin has produced a series of double exposures...

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Foyer-Gallery: Photography © Heji Shin

For the 2013/14 season at the Deutsche Oper Berlin the photographer Heji Shin has produced a series of double exposures that capture the many facets of the opera house. The artist superimposed shots of the building's architecture over everyday Berlin scenes; monuments, flora, young couples and protest demonstrations fuse with the facade, orchestra pit and auditorium. The technique of exposing a 35mm film two or more times creates the impression of a simultaneity that transcends spacial and temporal boundaries and intertwines opposites. The photograph ceases to be a mere documentation of reality; it becomes the poetry of experimentation. Inspired by the premieres of the current season, Shin has created photographs that do more than simply illustrate; like each production mounted in the opera house, they rather open up new realms of possibility in which individuals can form their own, personal perspectives.

The photographer Heji Shin (born 1976 in Seoul) lives and works in Berlin and New York. Her pictures are published regularly in periodicals such as 032C, SZ Magazin, Zeit Magazin, Monopol, Brandeins, among others. Heji Shin's works have featured in group shows in the Palais de Tokyo (Paris), Wiensowski and Harbor (Berlin) and “based in Berlin” (Berlin) and she has recently had solo exhibitions at Real Fine Arts (New York) and Mathew (Berlin).

Each photo has been printed in a limited edition of three copies, which are for sale. Proceeds will be donated to Deutsche Oper Berlin projects. Prospective buyers should contact Nicole Sachse-Handke at sachse-handke@deutscheoperberlin.de .

Wed, 28. Aug.
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Photography © Heji Shin

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Fr, 15. Feb.
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Jonas Kaufmann sings Wagner

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Jonas Kaufmann sings Wagner

Cover © Decca

Cover © Decca

„Wesendonck Lieder“ and arias from RIENZI, TANNHÄUSER, LOHENGRIN, DIE WALKÜRE, SIEGFRIED und DIE MEISTERINGER VON NÜRNBERG
Conductor: Donald Runnicles
Orchestra & chorus of the Deutsche Oper Berlin
With Markus Brück
1 CD
Recording from September 2012
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On six separate occasions last September the Orchestra of the Deutsche Oper Berlin, its General Music Director Donald Runnicles and the tenor Jonas Kaufmann all converged on the grand auditorium of the broadcasting centre in Nalepastraße to revel in its legendary acoustics and record one of the most significant song CDs of Wagner Year 2013. The recording includes works as diverse as the "Wesendonck Lieder", extracts from THE RING OF THE NIBELUNG and the seldom-heard original full version of the "Tale of the Holy Grail" from LOHENGRIN. The Chorus of the Deutsche Oper Berlin performing the original version of the "Tale of the Holy Grail" and Markus Brück as Wolfram and King Henry in extracts from TANNHÄUSER and LOHENGRIN complete the group of Deutsche Oper Berlin artists who came together for this recording with Jonas Kaufmann.

This CD is the latest in a long line of Deutsche Oper Berlin song-recital recordings - many of them legendary - which began in the 1960s with Martha Mödl, Christa Ludwig, Rita Streich, Hermann Prey and Grace Bumbry and went on to include Placido Domingo, René Kollo, Peter Seiffert (with whom the Orchestra recorded a total of three recitals), Thomas Quasthoff and most recently Klaus Florian Vogt. Produced on the Decca label, the CD featuring Jonas Kaufmann and Donald Runnicles went on sale in mid February.


Next performances

Fri, 18. Apr

Parsifal

Deutsche Oper Berlin / 17:00h / read more / Buy ticket

Sat, 19. Apr

La Traviata

Deutsche Oper Berlin / 19:30h / read more / Buy ticket

Sun, 20. Apr

Rigoletto

Deutsche Oper Berlin / 18:00h / read more / Buy ticket

Mon, 21. Apr

Parsifal

Deutsche Oper Berlin / 16:00h / read more / Buy ticket


The Premieres 2013/2014



Further News

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Tischlerei - A new stage for the Deutsch...

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Tischlerei - A new stage for the Deutsche Oper Berlin

Hoffmann © Thomas Aurin

Hoffmann © Thomas Aurin

Since November 2012 a new venue dedicated to the musical theatre of the 21st century has been located at the rear of the Deutsche Oper Berlin - the Tischlerei. This former carpentry workshop has been transformed into a theatre space, yet the spirit of the atelier has been preserved and now informs the programme of events held there. With other spaces given over to productions reflecting the repertory side of the opera house, the Tischlerei hosts only premieres and brand-new productions. Experiments and works in progress are the watchwords here. The space is fast becoming a platform for 'off' artists and young drama producers. The Swedish director Jakop Ahlbom, presenting his first work in Berlin, is a case in point. Younger talents, too, from the disciplines of direction, song and instrumental music, are working with singers and musicians of the Deutsche Oper Berlin and partnering up with Berlin schools of music, the University of the Arts Graz and the Deutsche Bank Foundation.

Three young composers, Birke J. Bertelsmeier, Gordon Kampe and Dariusz Przybylski, are representative of different aspects of the avant-garde. They write new material aimed at children and adults alike. And the Tischlerei also has its own take on well-known works of the repertoire: composer Anne Champert is reworking the music of Jacques Offenbach for “Hoffmann”, while three distinct versions of Mozart's “Così fan tutte” are exploring avenues for rendering the classics that go beyond 'director's theatre'.

“LoveAffairs” is another instance of exploration of new forms of musical theatre, in which distinct genres of musical theatre are toyed and experimented with in separate locations within the hall. Joining the dialogue and complicit in the creative tension between serious music and entertainment-led music, opera singers, young Berliners and the Swiss pop band “The bianca Story” have collaborated on a production on the subject of “Immortality”: “Gilghamesh Must Die!”. And with its participation in the Sound Walk the Tischlerei is opening its doors in more than just a figurative sense: "The Big Boo" takes audiences on a tour in and around the Deutsche Oper on the trail of different protest cultures. Concerts and activities for children and teenagers of the Young Opera section are likewise based in the Tischlerei, as is the new programme of chamber music concerts by the Orchestra of the Deutsche Oper Berlin.

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Tischlerei 2013/2014

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Tischlerei 2013/2014

  • Premieres 2013/2014


    Hoffmann / First performance
    Phantasmagoria based on Offenbach / read more
    18., 19., 20., 23. Sep. 2013
    3x Così fan tutte / Guest Performances, Kunstuni Graz
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) / read more
    25., 26., 27. Oct. 2013
    Kannst Du pfeifen, Johanna? / First performance
    Music theatre by Gordon Kampe (*1976) / read more
    30. Nov.; 1., 2., 9., 10., 11. Dec. 2013
    Gilgamesh Must Die! / First performance
    Concert theatre with „The bianca Story“ / read more
    17., 20., 21., 22., 25. Mar. 2014
    The big “Boo!” / First performance
    A Sound-Walk / read more
    11., 12., 13., 14., 15. 16. June 2014
    LoveAffairs / First performance
    Love case scenarios / read more
    20., 21., 24., 25., 26., 27. Jun. 2014


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